Boeing Reports Second Quarter Results


Reading time ( words)

The Boeing Company reported second-quarter revenue of $24.8 billion on strong commercial deliveries and services growth. GAAP loss per share of $0.37 and core loss per share (non-GAAP) of $0.44 reflect the previously announced 787 cost reclassification ($1.33 per share) and charges on the 747 program ($1.28 per share) and the KC-46 Tanker program ($0.62 per share), partially offset by solid execution and higher volume.

"The underlying operating performance of the company remains solid with our commercial and defense teams again delivering strong revenues and operating cash flow. Actions taken during the quarter that impacted our earnings were the right, proactive steps to reduce risk and strengthen our position for the future," said Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg. "Our strong cash generation also supported our ongoing commitment to invest in product innovation and in our people, and return substantial cash to shareholders through stock repurchases and dividends."

"As we look forward to the second half of the year, we anticipate continued strong operating performance across our production and services programs on generally healthy demand for our broad portfolio of market-leading offerings. Our commercial airplane development programs remain on track and we have successfully completed the flight testing required for customer approval of key KC-46 production milestones."

"Overall our teams remain intensely focused on improving productivity and quality, building out our large and diverse backlog, investing in future growth, and delivering increasing value to all of our stakeholders."

GAAP earnings per share guidance for 2016 has been adjusted to between $6.40 and $6.60 from $8.45 and $8.65 and core earnings per share (non-GAAP)* guidance has been adjusted to between $6.10 and $6.30 from $8.15 and $8.35 to reflect the impact of the 787 R&D reclassification and the 747 and Tanker charges, solid performance and tax benefits.

Operating cash flow in the quarter was $3.2 billion, largely reflecting commercial airplane production rates and solid operating performance (Table 2). During the quarter, the company repurchased 15.3 million shares for $2.0 billion, leaving $8.5 billion remaining under the current repurchase authorization which is expected to be completed over approximately the next two years. The company also paid $691 million in dividends in the quarter, reflecting an approximately 20 percent increase in dividends per share compared to the same period of the prior year.

Cash and investments in marketable securities totaled $9.3 billion, up from $8.4 billion at the beginning of the quarter. Debt was $11.0 billion, up from the beginning of the quarter, primarily due to the issuance of new debt.

Total company backlog at quarter-end was $472 billion, down from $480 billion at the beginning of the quarter, and included net orders for the quarter of $17 billion.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

Exciting Advances From NVIDIA’s GPU

05/03/2021 | Dan Feinberg, I-Connect007
NVIDIA’s Graphics Processing Technology Conference was, as expected, a showcase of new developments, as well as an opportunity for engineers and developers to learn, enhance skills, and discuss new ideas. Just hearing about all the amazing new developments and the accelerating expansion of AI in virtually all aspects of modern society gives those who attended a better idea of just how much AI is and will continue to change their work and our world.

Extending Field of View in Advanced Imaging Systems

08/12/2019 | DARPA
The military relies on advanced imaging systems for a number of critical capabilities and applications – from Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) and situational awareness to weapon sights. These powerful systems enable defense users to capture and analyze visual data, providing key insights both on and off the battlefield.

Inexpensive, Simple Fabrication Method Poised to Expand Microlens Applications

06/17/2019 | OSA
A growing number of applications, including smartphone cameras, depend on microlenses to boost performance. A newly developed technology, called laser catapulting, could make it much easier and less expensive to fabricate these miniaturized lenses with customized properties, such as shape or focusing power.



Copyright © 2021 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.