Meller Custom Fabricates UAV Optics for Smaller Drones


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Meller Optics, Inc. has introduced custom fabricated UAV optics for the new smaller drones and tiny flying robots that are made from sapphire for demanding applications or zinc selenide.

Meller UAV Optics are ideally suited for use in ever-shrinking drones and tiny flying robots and feature round sapphire lenses from 0.25" up and partial spheres as small as 0.12" with varying focal lengths. Available with A/R coatings for the visible to 10.6 microns, these sapphire optics are second only to diamond in terms of hardness for demanding applications.

Meller UAV Optics are also offered made from zinc selenide (ZnSe) from 0.25" up. Developed for OEMs, the firm can incorporate stepped edges and other special characteristics for mounting such as slots or wedges. Flatness can be held to 1/10th wave per inch in the visible with surface finishes from 60-40 to 40-20 scratch-dig.

Meller UAV Optics are priced according to material, configuration, and quantity. Price quotations are available upon request.

About Meller Optics, Inc. 

Founded in 1921, Meller Optics has been providing high quality optics to defense, medical, laser, and industrial markets for 90 years now. Specializing in the grinding and polishing of hard, durable materials such as sapphire and ruby, the company has also developed high-speed, low-cost finishing processes for a variety of optical materials such as laser glasses, fused silica, zinc selenide, germanium, silicon, fluorides, and ceramic materials. Configurations include windows, substrates, lenses, domes, and prisms.

Meller Optics is ISO 9001:2008 certified and in addition to providing standard, off-the-shelf products, they custom fabricate components that meet exacting specifications from delicate, difficult to work with optical materials. They also supply quality Microlux Alumina polishing abrasives and Gugolz optical polishing pitch.

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