Lockheed Martin's Legion Pod Takes to the Skies


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Lockheed Martin's Legion Pod recently completed its first flight test, successfully tracking multiple airborne targets while flying on an F-16 in Fort Worth, Texas.

Legion Pod was integrated onto the F-16 without making any hardware or software changes to the aircraft. Additional flight tests on the F-16 and F-15C will continue throughout the year.

"Legion Pod is a production-ready, multi-sensor system," said Paul Lemmo, vice president of fire control at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. "With our most advanced hardware and software, a hot production line and an established logistics depot, Legion Pod provides a high-performance, low-risk, affordable capability to warfighters today."

Equipped with an IRST21™ infrared sensor and advanced networking and data processing technology, Legion Pod provides high-fidelity detection and tracking of airborne targets. It also accommodates additional sensors without costly system or aircraft modifications.

Legion Pod is available to meet the requirements of the U.S. Air Force F-15C infrared search and track program of record, which include long-range detection and tracking in a wide field of view. Its flexible design and open systems architecture enable Legion Pod to offer a variety of capabilities for other fighter and non-fighter aircraft.

For additional information, click here.

About Lockheed Martin

Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 112,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The Corporation's net sales for 2014 were $45.6 billion.

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