Poland Receives Delivery of First HIMARS


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Lockheed Martin, through the U.S. Army, has successfully delivered an initial shipment of HIMARS launchers to Poland.

HIMARS provides immediate capability to deliver long range precision fires at distances up to 300 km and is interoperable with procured defense systems. Subsequent shipments of HIMARS will be delivered this year resulting in additional capabilities for Poland.  

“The combat-proven HIMARS will provide credible deterrence against aggression and significantly increase capability of the Polish Armed Forces and their NATO allies,” said Jay Price, vice president of Precision Fires for Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fires Control. 

The Armaments Agency of the Ministry of National Defense is expected to invite Lockheed Martin to negotiate a Framework Agreement for the Homar-A program. Under Homar-A, Lockheed Martin with Polish Industry will integrate key components of the HIMARS rocket launcher on a Jelcz 6x6 truck. The negotiations will also include discussion around Polish production of munitions.

“The development of industrial partnership under Homar-A initiative marks another major step in our engagement to strengthening Poland’s economic growth and security through partnerships with local industry base. We’re looking forward to jointly create a safer tomorrow for Poland and the entire region,” said Robert Orzyłowski, Lockheed Martin director Poland, Central and East Europe.

A trusted partner for Poland’s national defense, industry, and economy, Lockheed Martin has invested $1.8 billion (USD) in Poland over the last 10 years. Today, its in-country operations sustain 6,700 high-value Polish jobs, of which 1,500 are with aircraft manufacturer PZL Mielec, a Lockheed Martin company and one of Poland’s leading defense exporters.  

Lockheed Martin opened its office in central Warsaw in 1996 and partners with the Polish Ministry of Defense on a variety of defense and security programs. The company’s contribution to the missile programs is a core element of Poland’s national defense and provides vital capabilities to Polish Armed Forces.

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