CACI Wins $1.4B Task Order with Defense Threat Reduction Agency


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CACI International Inc. has been awarded the Defense Threat Reduction Agency’s (DTRA) Decisive Action Task order, a single-award task order worth approximately $1.4 billion to continue providing DTRA with mission expertise in support of countering and deterring Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD), and threat networks.

John Mengucci, CACI President and Chief Executive Officer, said, “CACI’s understanding of DTRA’s critical mission spans more than 14 years. Our continued support through this task order is a testament to our commitment to ensuring our nation’s security while enabling and enhancing innovative expertise and technology, which continues to accelerate and modernize DTRA’s mission.”

This task order continues and expands CACI’s previous work as part of the Joint Improvised-Threat Defeat Organization’s (JIDO) Focused Support/Decisive Effort (FS/DE) task order. Under this task order, CACI will provide DTRA with a wide range of analytical expertise to drive and enable mission solutions to counter and deter multi-faceted threats. CACI will also enhance the agency’s situational understanding of threat networks and support combatant commands with the integration of analysis, capabilities, and technologies, to defeat adversary networks that pose a threat.

The task order has a one-year period of performance with four one-year options and was awarded under the General Services Administration (GSA) One Acquisition Solution for Integrated Services (OASIS) pool 1 contract. Work will be performed within and outside the Continental United States.

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