Raytheon Unveils New Dismounted Soldier Training Simulator


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Raytheon (NYSE: RTN) unveiled a new immersive military training product today at I/ITSEC, the world's largest modeling, simulation and training event. The Synthetic Training Environment Soldier Virtual Trainer, or STE SVT, uses virtual reality to train squads of soldiers in multiple scenarios while using real and virtual weapons.

The new virtual simulator is designed to train dismounted infantry and uses the latest technological advances to deliver highly effective training at a moment's notice from any location. It delivers unmatched realism and accessibility while dramatically reducing the cost and logistical challenge of high-consequence training missions.

"Raytheon tech helps specialists around the world prepare for the world's most important missions," said Bob Williams, vice president of Global Training Solutions at Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services. "We are blending our understanding of training with emerging technologiesaugmented reality, virtual reality, artificial intelligence, cybersecurity and big datato connect and secure military training like never before."

The vision for the U.S. Army's Synthetic Training Environment is to create a common synthetic environment for soldiers to train together from anywhere in the world. Raytheon's STE SVT answers that call and will completely change the way military training is done. The current room-sized simulators will be replaced by portable laptop-powered AR/VR headsets that easily can be transported to soldiers for use anywhere at any time.

To experience the STE SVT during I/ITSEC, please visit Raytheon's booth #1037 at the Orange County Convention Center, Dec. 2-5, 2019.

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