American Standard Circuits Discusses e-Book on Designing Flex and Rigid-Flex


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American Standard Circuits’ VP of Business Development Dave Lackey and President/CEO Anaya Vardya have co-authored The Printed Circuit Designer’s Guide to…Flex and Rigid-Flex Fundamentals, published by I-Connect007.

American Standard Circuits is an industry leader when it comes to high-technology printed circuit boards, especially flex and rigid-flex printed circuit boards. So, it was natural that they would write about flex and rigid-flex for I-Connect007’s new “Guide to…” e-book series.

Goldman: Gentlemen, congratulations on the book. Tell me a little bit about what it covers and why you chose this subject.

Lackey: We work so closely with designers all the time that we felt it would be a good idea to write this book for designers. We wanted to cover some of the more common fundamentals that we work on together. We focus on things like dos and don’ts of designing flex and rigidflex boards, design guidelines, construction tips, and anything else we can help them with during the design process rather than while parts are being built.

Vardya: Our philosophy at American Standard is to help our customers in any way that we can. We want to be their experts and make it easy for them to get their boards built. Over the last few years, we have seen more designers venturing into the flex and rigid-flex arena. There are several differences between these boards and regular rigid PCBs. We wanted to share our knowledge with them and alert them to various items in the design process where they would want to consult with their PCB fabricator. We felt that this book was a perfect way to do this.

Goldman: I know you wrote it for PCB designers. How do you expect this book to help them?

Lackey: It is critical for designers to work closely with their PCB fabricator when designing flex and rigid-flex PCBs. We wanted to educate them on several issues where they would want to collaborate with their fabricator while educating them about the various nuances of these circuit boards. If there is anything we can do to make building flex and rigid-flex boards more productive and economical, we want to help them do that.

To read the full version of this interview which appeared in the March 2017 issue of The PCB Magazine, click here.

To download a copy of, The Printed Circuit Designer's Guide to...Flex and Rigid-Flex Fundamentals click here. To have a copy of this book printed on demand, click here.

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