From the Hill: Technology and Reliability Demands Drive Designers and MIL-PRF-31032 Specification

The branches of military services continue to counter threats by shifting from boots on the ground to more technical solutions that do not require additional personal. The combat environment requires designs that require faster decisions and more rapid processing, rugged displays to withstand 120°F outside temperatures, extreme cold, blowing sand, and abnormal mechanical forces like the shock and vibration in a helicopter; they have to be smaller, lighter-weight, and extremely reliable.

Unmanned vehicles require more AI and associated technology. Electronic uniforms compliment camouflage and drive designs using electronic fabrics. For example, uniforms with cameras on the back of the soldier which project that image on the uniform front make the solder totally invisible (the ultimate in camouflage). Increased electronic guidance for more projectiles—including bullets, space warfare countermeasures, and cyber threats—push new technology and drive printed circuit features and their associated reliability. With the future demand for more and more military electronics, certification to the PCB MIL-PRF-31032 specification becomes a business decision for many fabricators.Fluency in the MIL-PRF-31032 language is a key first step to understand the requirements and communicate with the Department of Defense (DoD). This column will define many of these terms and is a must-review before in-forming the DoD of your intent to certify. Let’s take a look at these unique new words, including expanded definitions, and a quick-glance glossary.

To continue reading this column, head on over to your October 2019 issue of PCB007 Magazine.

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2019

From the Hill: Technology and Reliability Demands Drive Designers and MIL-PRF-31032 Specification

11-12-2019

The branches of military services continue to counter threats by shifting from boots on the ground to more technical solutions that do not require additional personal. The combat environment requires designs that require faster decisions and more rapid processing, rugged displays to withstand 120°F outside temperatures, extreme cold, blowing sand, and abnormal mechanical forces like the shock and vibration in a helicopter; they have to be smaller, lighter-weight, and extremely reliable.

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The Past 15 Years: Changes to MIL-PRF-31032 Certification, Part 2

10-01-2019

The Part 1 of this column series introduced background information and data from changes in military certification to MIL-PRF-31032 from 2003 to 2018. In this installment, Mike Hill provides an overview of the possible related factors to what could have caused the reduction in certified companies, including a decline in the total military market; cost of certification; and number of military boards now built to industry standards, to name a few.

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From the Hill: The Past 15 Years: Changes to MIL-PRF-31032 Certification, Part 1

08-25-2019

Fifteen years ago, when certification to MIL-PRF-31032 was in the early years, I authored an article about certification status. Now, it’s time to revisit the subject, data, and changes that have occurred since.

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