Boeing to Help U.S. Air Force Keep T-38 Trainers Flying Through 2026


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Boeing, which has maintained and supported the U.S. Air Force T-38 Talon trainer fleet for 16 years, will do that for another ten years through a new contract worth up to $855 million.

The company will work on avionics, cockpit displays, control panels, and communications systems for 456 of the aircraft as well as upgrading 37 aircrew training devices.

“We are playing a vital role in preparing pilots to make the transition to modern fighter aircraft,” said Kurt Schroeder, T-38 program manager. ”Working with our Air Force customers, Boeing is keeping the T-38 mission ready for the next decade.”

Originally manufactured by Northrop, the T-38 is the primary training jet for the Air Force and NATO nations. It first flew in 1959.

The Air Force plans to replace the T-38 with the new T-X pilot training system. Boeing is teamed with Saab in competing for T-X. They will offer an all-new, purpose-built system that includes the aircraft and associated ground-based training and support systems.

About Boeing

A unit of The Boeing Company, Defense, Space & Security is one of the world's largest defense, space and security businesses specializing in innovative and capabilities-driven customer solutions, and the world’s largest and most versatile manufacturer of military aircraft. Headquartered in St. Louis, Defense, Space & Security is a $31 billion business with about 50,000 employees worldwide. Follow us on Twitter: @BoeingDefense.

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