Project JUPITR Early Warning System Can Save Lives


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At U.S. military installations throughout the world, military police monitor force protection sensors, which consist of conventional and thermal imaging cameras, ground surveillance radar and seismic and acoustic sensors.

Installations also have chemical biological sensors, but they are operated as an independent system manned by chemical biological specialists in another location.

Project JUPITR's early warning system aims at combining powerful surveillance tools into a single integrated system so military police and chemical biological specialists can immediately cross check their data and respond to incidents faster.

JUPITR, or Joint U.S. Forces in Korea Portal and Integrated Threat Recognition, is a three-year advanced technology demonstration of biosurveillance technology for deployment on the Korean Peninsula.

The leg is an assessment of 10 different biological agent detection technologies in the field to determine their speed, accuracy and suitability for a field environment.

JUPITR.JPG

In June 2015, a team of U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center's, or ECBC's, chemical biological specialists and Joint Project Manager, or JPM, Guardian software systems and hardware engineers performed an operational demonstration of a system of integrated force protection and chemical biological sensors on Osan Air Base, South Korea, with U.S. Army and Air Force military police and chemical biological specialists.

"We had a system called the Joint All-Hazards Common Control Station [JACCS] that we use in Afghanistan," said Robert Bednarczyk, deputy product manager for Joint Product Manager Force Protection Systems and the leader of the early warning effort. "It features a common operating picture, which displays all the force protection sensor data on one screen."

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