DARPA's RadioMap Program Enters Third Phase


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DARPA has awarded a contract for the third and final phase of its Advanced RF Mapping program, known as RadioMap, which seeks to provide real-time awareness of radio spectrum use across frequency, geography and time. Akin to smartphone maps that show color-coded current traffic conditions, RadioMap is developing technology that visually overlays spectrum information on a map enabling rapid frequency deconfliction and maximizing use of available spectrum for communications and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) systems.

DARPA has awarded a contract for the third and final phase of its Advanced RF Mapping program, known as RadioMap, which seeks to provide real-time awareness of radio spectrum use across frequency, geography and time. Akin to smartphone maps that show color-coded current traffic conditions, RadioMap is developing technology that visually overlays spectrum information on a map enabling rapid frequency deconfliction and maximizing use of available spectrum for communications and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) systems.

Lockheed Martin Corp. in Manassas, Virginia, was recently awarded an $11.8 million Phase 3 contract to further develop technology from Phases 1 and 2 into a full system suitable for transition to the military services.

Today’s interconnected wireless world has led to congested airwaves, making Radio Frequency (RF) management a hot topic. For military members around the globe, efficiently managing the congested RF spectrum is critical to ensure effective communications and intelligence gathering.

“RadioMap adds value to existing radios, jammers and other RF electronic equipment used by our military forces in the field,” said John Chapin, DARPA program manager. “This program doesn’t require purchasing new spectrum-sensing devices. Rather, it uses existing radios and jammers that do double-duty. In the ‘down’ time when they aren’t performing their primary function, the devices sense the spectrum around them and, through RadioMap technology, provide an accurate picture of what frequencies are currently in use and where.”

RadioMap seeks to make spectrum management more efficient by giving operators the tools to see real and potential frequency interference and usage. For example, a forward-deployed unit might reserve a particular frequency for a communications link at a specific time, but due to the dynamic nature of the situation, the frequency ends up not being needed. RadioMap’s real-time visualization of actual spectrum use helps spectrum managers detect the unused frequency and enhance mission effectiveness by quickly reusing it for other needs.

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