U.S. Army Turns to Raytheon to Support Aircraft for Foreign Nations


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The U.S. Army Contracting Command awarded Raytheon Company an indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contract to provide communications systems, support and training for aircraft made available to foreign nations through the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) process. The five-year contract has a ceiling value of $80 million. 

"For more than 50 years, Raytheon has developed, delivered and supported tactical communications systems so warfighters can reliably and securely share critical information needed to accomplish their missions," said Scott Whatmough, vice president of Integrated Communications Systems for Raytheon's Space and Airborne Systems business. "We are committed to building on that proud legacy through our enduring partnership with the U.S. Army and allied forces around the world."

The agreement covers production, support and training for the ARC-231 and ARC-164 radio systems that are used on rotary wing platforms such as UH-60M Blackhawks, CH-47F Chinooks, UH-72A Lakotas and AH-64E Apaches; and the APX-119 transponder that is used on a wide range of fixed-wing aircraft.

The Foreign Military Sales Systems Communications contract will be managed from Raytheon's Space and Airborne Systems facility in Fort Wayne, Indiana. The communications systems will be manufactured at the business' facility in Largo, Florida.

About Raytheon

Raytheon Company, with 2014 sales of $23 billion and 61,000 employees worldwide, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, civil government and cybersecurity markets throughout the world. With a history of innovation spanning 93 years, Raytheon provides state-of-the-art electronics, mission systems integration and other capabilities in the areas of sensing; effects; and command, control, communications and intelligence systems, as well as cybersecurity and a broad range of mission support services. Raytheon is headquartered in Waltham, Mass.

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