U.S. Army Buys Seven More Q-53s from Lockheed Martin


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When troops need to set up and quickly track incoming threats, they rely on battlefield-proven 360-degree protection provided by the Lockheed Martin AN/TPQ-53 (Q-53) counterfire target acquisition radar. The U.S. Army announced that it will buy an additional seven Q-53 systems valued at $85 million, ensuring that the Q-53 continues to be the radar of choice to keep troops safe from persistent insurgent attacks.

Additionally, Lockheed Martin was selected in June to upgrade 19 of the U.S. Army’s Q-53 radars. The high-performing hardware and software is constantly evolving to accommodate technical advances in capabilities and address global threats.

“Soldiers can rapidly deploy the truck-mounted Q-53 and quickly determine the source of enemy fire,” said Bob Stelmack, Q-53 program manager for Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training. “The 55 systems Lockheed Martin has delivered to the U.S. Army give troops proven, advanced protection when they need it most.”

The Q-53 can be automatically leveled and remotely operated at 90- or 360-degrees and operated from a laptop computer or from the fully equipped climate-controlled command vehicle.

Since Lockheed Martin won the development contract for the Q-53 radar in 2007, the company has won four additional contracts (for a total of 97) and delivered 55 systems on-time and on-budget to the U.S. Army. Work on the radars is performed at Lockheed Martin facilities in Syracuse, N.Y., Moorestown, N.J., Owego, N.Y. and Clearwater, Fla. The Army is expected to award a full-rate production contract by early 2016, covering an anticipated 77 additional systems.

About Lockheed Martin

Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 112,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The Corporation’s net sales for 2014 were $45.6 billion.

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