Lockheed Martin Upgrading System That Manages Virtually Everything Flown by U.S. Military Forces


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Lockheed Martin is upgrading the battle command system that directs flying operations for all airborne assets of the U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps, including fighters, bombers, tankers, unmanned aerial vehicles, helicopters and cruise missiles.

The U.S. Air Force awarded Lockheed Martin a contract to update the Air Tasking Order Management System (ATOMS), which allows commanders to deploy air assets, execute air tasking orders and direct joint U.S. air operations through centralized planning.

ATOMS is replacing part of the Theater Battle Management Core System (TBMCS), which has been referred to as the “engine of the air operations center.” The Air Force Command and Control Air Operations Suite (C2AOS) – Command and Control Information Services (C2IS) is providing the next generation of TBMCS replacement applications such as ATOMS to provide the automation necessary to plan, direct and control all theater air operations, and to coordinate air activities with ground and maritime elements.

"Since developing TBMCS in 1995, we've ensured that the system provides the tools needed for coordinated air operations," said Dr. Rob Smith, vice president of C4ISR Systems for Lockheed Martin. "This effort provides the warfighter with additional system to system interoperability to support their continually evolving mission.”

Lockheed Martin will update over 250 air tasking requirements, which will improve interoperability between ATOMS and other management systems, such as legacy Air Force and Army air management systems. Lockheed Martin will also enhance net-enabled warfare capabilities, which will allow the Air Force to better manage remote guided and controlled weapons through the system.

Lockheed Martin is commemorating 20 years of supporting TBMCS. Operationally deployed in 2000, TBMCS is used by all air wings of the United States military to plan and execute airborne missions, maintain automated airspace deconfliction, and enable synchronized air battle management.

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