Libra Industries Acquires ACD; Establishes New Facility in Richardson, Texas


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Libra Industries, a privately held electronics manufacturing services (EMS) provider, is pleased to announce the acquisition of ACD. The state-of-the-art facility in Richardson, TX will now operate as the Libra Industries ACD Facility. The acquisition is a major step in Libra Industries’ strategy to increase revenues and capture a larger share of the electronics contracting market.

Libra Industries was founded in 1980 when the EMS industry was just getting started. Since then, the company has steadily grown because of its ongoing dedication to investing in people, quality systems, and the latest manufacturing technology and processes. Like Libra Industries, ACD is an electronics contract manufacturer that produces printed circuit board assemblies (PCBAs), resulting in a synergistic relationship and a perfect cultural fit. Libra Industries has hired Scott Fillebrown, CTO, and Steve Schwaebler, VP of Operations, to operate the Libra Industries ACD Facility and ACD employees will join the Libra Industries team.

From its four state-of-the-art manufacturing facilities in Northeast Ohio and now Texas, Libra Industries serves a diverse base of industries such as medical, military/aerospace, industrial and LED lighting. The company seeks customers who require customized solutions with technically sophisticated manufacturing and quality requirements. In order to do so, Libra Industries has worked hard to earn an impressive array of certifications and registrations such as ISO 9001:2008 and ISO 13485-2003, FDA, UL, CSA and ITAR.

Libra Industries’ investment in ACD demonstrates the company’s continued commitment to providing customized manufacturing solutions to help make its customers more competitive and improve their profitability.

Libra Industries, and now ACD customers, will continue to receive the high level of service the company has become known for over the last 35 years. 

About Libra Industries

Libra Industries is a leading provider of integrated Electronic Manufacturing Services (EMS) serving OEMs with complex or technologically sophisticated manufacturing requirements in a broad range of industries including industrial automation, medical, military and aerospace, instrumentation and LED lighting. Four world-class manufacturing facilities allow Libra Industries to provide customers with manufacturing flexibility including complete system build, module and subassembly production, as well as simple to complex PC board assembly. With an ongoing commitment to investment in people, quality systems, and the latest manufacturing equipment and processes, Libra Industries is committed to managing their clients’ products from initial design and prototype to full production; assisting their clients in their efforts to improve time to market, reduce total systems cost, and increase quality.

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