SnapEDA Now Supports Cadence OrCAD/Allegro and Pulsonix


Reading time ( words)

SnapEDA, the fastest and easiest way to find and share electronics design libraries, has introduced new export support for its popular computer-aided design (CAD) library and community.

SnapEDA accelerates the electronic design process for thousands of professional designers and engineers around the world by providing a library of millions of CAD building blocks they can build on top of to design better products faster. 

By exporting to popular CAD tools, SnapEDA complements existing workflows, providing engineers with an instant productivity boost in their design tool of choice.

SnapEDA has announced support of its vast CAD library for Cadence OrCAD/Allegro and Pulsonix users. These new export formats join existing support for Altium, CadSoft Eagle, and KiCad. 

In the quickly growing Internet of Things market, electronic devices are proliferating and diversifying, and time-to-market is becoming more crucial than ever for electronics companies looking to stay competitive. 

“At the heart of every connected device is a printed circuit board, and designers need faster, more efficient ways to bring them to life to keep up with the fast pace of innovation," said Natasha Baker, founder and CEO of SnapEDA. 

With SnapEDA, engineers save hours of time by downloading CAD building blocks instantly, rather than designing them from scratch. This allows them to focus on optimizing their designs, and innovating better products. 

To ensure quality, SnapEDA pairs powerful algorithms that run a diagnostic test on each CAD building block, with a rating system that allows engineers to vet the quality of CAD parts.

“Engineers need accurate data they can trust. At SnapEDA, the vast majority of our technology in development revolves around making sure engineers feel confident with their design data,” said Garret Fick, Co-Founder and CTO of SnapEDA. 

SnapEDA fixes all the broken and outdated aspects of the electronics design process by bridging desktop tools with cloud-based solutions.

About SnapEDA

Based in Toronto, Canada, SnapEDA is web platform for electronics design that’s changing the way engineers design electronics. Just like piecing together Lego, SnapEDA provides a library of millions of ready-to-use building blocks that accelerate electronics design. Built on powerful algorithms, these computer-aided design (CAD) building blocks can be downloaded instantly to an engineer’s CAD software of choice using robust conversion technology, dramatically improving productivity. Thousands of engineers and designers in nearly every industry use SnapEDA, including consumer electronics, industrial, biomedical, automotive, aerospace, defense, semiconductor and academia.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

Brad Griffin Discusses Cadence’s New Transient Solver Technology

10/26/2020 | Andy Shaughnessy, Design007 Magazine
Andy Shaughnessy speaks with Brad Griffin, product marketing director for Cadence Design Systems, about their new Clarity 3D Transient Solver, which is designed for system-level EMI simulation. Brad explains how the new solver, based on the company’s matrix technology, can yield results 10 times faster than existing solvers when simulating IC packages, PCBs, and SoIC designs.

I-Connect007 Editor’s Choice: Five Must-Reads for the Week

10/23/2020 | Andy Shaughnessy, Design007 Magazine
After a crazy year like this, we shouldn’t be surprised that this trade show season is unlike any other. Here’s one of the many “silver linings” of 2020: We actually dodged a bullet earlier this year when COVID-19 hit after most of our industry’s big events had taken place. In this week’s top five, we have an assortment of trade show and conference news items, plus a few examples of technological trends and innovation.

This Month in Design007 Magazine: Thermal Fundamentals With Mike Jouppi

09/09/2020 | I-Connect007 Editorial Team
The I-Connect007 team recently interviewed Mike Jouppi, one of the champions of thermal management in PCBs. Mike spent decades working on updating the old IPC current-carrying data, which dated back to the 1950s, and he is the primary architect behind IPC-2152— the standard for determining current-carrying capacity in printed board design. As Mike explained in this wide-ranging interview, even if you’re using the latest thermal design software, you still need to have a firm understanding of the fundamentals.



Copyright © 2020 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.