CACI Wins $514 Million Task Order to Modernize U.S. Army Networks


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CACI International Inc. announced that it was awarded a new five-year (one-year base and four one-year options), single-award task order, with a potential value of $514 million, to provide network modernization of outside plant (OSP) infrastructure and facilities across major U.S. Army locations within the continental United States. CACI engineers, managers, and technicians will deliver enterprise technology to enhance capabilities and improve capacity needed for an underground fiber optic cable infrastructure required to support robust, reliable, high-speed voice, video and data networks for critical command and control systems.

As part of the OSP task order, awarded under the GSA’s Alliant 2 contract vehicle, CACI will engineer, furnish, install, and test (EFI&T) a turnkey solution to upgrade the existing OSP infrastructure and facilities at a minimum of 40 different military installations using industry best practices.

John Mengucci, CACI President and Chief Executive Officer, said, “CACI’s understanding and unique OSP knowledge will ensure that this modernization maximizes the Army’s current infrastructure, evolves to incorporate the latest network standards, and supports Army communications for software, data and analytics at scale as well as network security. Working with the Army, we will effectively deliver higher reliability and survivability supporting all missions with near-zero downtime” 

With more than 30 years of solid past performance and advanced network modernization capabilities, strengthened through CACI’s acquisition of LGS Innovations, this new task order further expands CACI’s current global OSP efforts providing repeatable infrastructure solutions that support current and future communications, command and control, and other requirements.

 

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