Microchip Expands Solutions With New High-Speed Analog-to-Digital Converter Family


Reading time ( words)

System designers have limited options for small, robust, feature-rich high-speed ADCs for extended-temperature operation. Microchip Technology Inc. announced it has filled this gap with its MCP37Dx1-80 family, the company’s second pipelined ADC offering and first to combine 80 MSPS in a choice of 12-, 14- and 16-bit resolutions, integrated digital features and qualification to a higher temperature range, including Automotive Electronics Council (AEC) Q100. 

“Our latest ADCs meet growing customer demand for robust devices that can be used in high-temperature applications and offer integrated digital processing functions that simplify design and reduce overall development costs,” said Bryan Liddiard, Vice President, Mixed-Signal and Linear division at Microchip. “The MCP37Dx1-80 family joins Microchip’s 200 MSPS ADCs to expand our high-speed offering into a much broader range of system design concepts.”

Microchip’s MCP37Dx1-80 ADCs enable a wide variety of aerospace and defense, industrial and automotive systems that require a high level of reliability. Key ADC device features include:

  • Robust and reliable design architecture: The ADCs operate over a -40°C to +125°C temperature range and are among the few high-speed ADCs in the industry qualified to AEC-Q100 grade 1 standards. This makes them ideal for demanding applications such as Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS), autonomous driving, Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites and test and measurement equipment.
  • Integrated digital features that eliminate external components and reduce MCU post-processing: Decimation filters improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), while a digital down-converter (DDC) supports communication designs and a noise-shaping requantizer in the 12-bit ADCs improves accuracy and performance.
  • Small size: Their compact 8mm x 8mm 121-pin ball grid array (BGA) packages with 0.65mm pitch also include built-in reference decoupling capacitors that further reduce cost and overall footprint by eliminating the need for external bypass capacitors.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

The Heterogeneous Integration Roadmap for Aerospace and Defense

11/24/2020 | Jeff Demmin, Keysight Technologies
Most people in the semiconductor industry are familiar with the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), which provided guidance for the industry starting in 1991 (as the National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors). As the benefits of Moore’s Law became more difficult and more expensive to achieve, the organization decided to publish a final version in 2016. The baton was handed to the Heterogeneous Integration Roadmap (HIR), with the realization that heterogeneous integration—assembling different types of devices rather than monolithic fabrication—is an important enabler for continued progress in the semiconductor industry.

The Aerospace and Defense Chapter of the HIR

11/03/2020 | I-Connect007 Editorial Team
Nolan Johnson and Andy Shaughnessy recently spoke with Jeff Demmin of Keysight Technologies, who breaks down the work his team has done on the Aerospace and Defense Chapter of the Heterogeneous Integration Roadmap (HIR).

I-Connect007 Editor's Choice: Five Must-Reads for the Week

09/04/2020 | Nolan Johnson, I-Connect007
When compiling my Top Five, I tend to let the reader views guide my choices. Oh, sure, sometimes a news item is significant well beyond the reads it receives; that’s why this is an editor’s picks, not a strict Top Five. Still, readership habits inform my choices. That makes it even more interesting when a week demonstrates a theme so convenient as to seem contrived. Take this week, for example. In this week’s top five, four of the top five are news reports on mil-aero topics. You, dear readers, gobbled up the military and aerospace news this week. The outlier is, as we all would expect, a conference report from our very own Pete Starkey.



Copyright © 2021 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.