SMTC Corporation Will Ramp Up Production for Violet Defense’s COVID-19 Disinfecting Equipment


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SMTC Corporation, a global electronics manufacturing services provider and winner of Frost & Sullivan’s 2019 Best Practices Award for Customer Value Leadership in the Electronics Manufacturing Services Industry, announced that Violet Defense has awarded SMTC Corporation a multi-million dollar, multi-year contract to build their pulsed Xenon UV disinfection devices, which utilize UV-C, UV-B, and UV-A to kill up to 99.9% of bacteria and viruses, including coronavirus. 

This technology can be deployed in multiple ways to disinfect surfaces and air in a variety of environments, and to disinfect personal protective and other equipment for personnel working on the front line in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We are pleased to team up with Violet Defense to manufacture an exciting line of commercial, industrial and consumer safety equipment that is designed as a cost-effective and proven method to destroy the human coronavirus, strain 229E, an accepted testing surrogate for the SARS-COV-2 virus,” said Ed Smith, SMTC Corporation’s President and Chief Executive Officer.

“We selected SMTC because of its excellence in manufacturing sophisticated equipment and its commitment to customer service,” said Terrance Berland, President and Chief Executive Officer of Violet Defense. “With the COVID-19 pandemic continuing to impact our lives every day, Violet Defense’s products are playing an important role in the effort to protect healthcare workers, first responders, and military personnel, and in the disinfection of everyday settings such as hotels, schools, food processing facilities, and athletic facilities.  SMTC’s local presence and reputation was an important factor in our choice, particularly as we have seen the need to dramatically increase our manufacturing capacity to meet the current demand for our products.”

SMTC is manufacturing products for Violet Defense at its Melbourne, Florida facility that has earned a number of industry and government accreditations, including ISO-9001, ISO-13485, AS 9100, IPC-A-610, Class II and Class III Workmanship, FAA-PMA, cGMP/QSR compliance, J-STD-001F and J-STD-001FS, DCAA and ITAR/EAR. 

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