U.S. Air Force Awards Raytheon $768 Million Advanced Medium Range Air-To-Air Missile Contract


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Raytheon Company was awarded the following contract as announced by the Department of Defense on December 27, 2019. 

Raytheon Missile Systems Co., Tucson, Arizona, has been awarded a $768,283,907non-competitive fixed-price incentive (firm) contract for Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) Production Lot 33. This contract provides for the production of the AMRAAM missiles, captive air training missiles, guidance sections, AMRAAM telemetry system, spares and other production engineering support hardware. 

Work will be performed in Tucson, Arizona, with an expected completion date of Feb. 28, 2023. This contract involves unclassified foreign military sales to Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Indonesia, Japan, Kuwait, Morocco, Netherlands, Norway, Oman, Poland, Qatar, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Slovakia, South Korea, Spain, Thailand, Turkey and United Kingdom, which accounts for 47% of the contract value. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Air Dominance Division Contracting Office, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, is the contracting activity.

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