Lockheed Martin Continues Partnership with Spain for Future Frigates


Reading time ( words)

Lockheed Martin recently signed a contract with Navantia to equip five new F-110 multimission frigates and their land-based test site (Centro de Integración de Sistemas en Tierra or CIST) – with Lockheed Martin’s first naval installation of its solid state S-band radar. The new F-110 frigates will be built by Spain’s national shipbuilder, Navantia.

Recently designated by the U.S. Government as AN/SPY-7(V)1, this technology is derived from current radar programs and significant Lockheed Martin investment. Variants of the SPY-7 radar will also be utilized on programs with Japan’s Aegis Ashore, the Royal Canadian Navy for the Canadian Surface Combatant program and the U.S. Government.

Why Does It Matter?

Providing Spain’s homeland with a defense for evolving threats, the F-110 program will further protect the country and its citizens. Equipped with the latest digital, solid-state radar technology, this crucial program:

  • Ensures Spain’s warfighters have the most capable combat system to perform new missions.
  • Strengthens Spain’s economy through industrial participation.
  • Advances Spain’s competitiveness in the global market by providing an opportunity for joint technology development.
  • Paves the way for interoperability with navies across the world, thanks to Aegis’ open architecture.

What’s the Technology?

The F-110 will host the first-ever naval solid state S-band radar for the Spanish Navy. To foster the growth of Spain’s defense and technology industries, Lockheed Martin and Spanish company, Indra, will jointly provide the radar. It will go to sea as part of the Aegis Weapon System, which will be integrated with the ship’s combat management system SCOMBA, when the first frigate deploys in 2026.

The Aegis Weapon System is the most deployed combat system in the world, and its flexible system enables it to fulfill a variety of missions. Due in part to its unique open architecture design, the Aegis family continues to grow internationally as more nations around the world partner with Lockheed Martin.

What’s the History?

Lockheed Martin and its Spanish partners have over 20 years of experience in development, production and integration of tactical naval radar systems. Spain’s defense industry growth and expansion of their maritime defense portfolio is a mission Lockheed Martin continues to support.

In the exciting future that lies ahead, Lockheed Martin will continue to work with Spanish industry to explore new areas of industrial cooperation in radar and combat system technologies. This will help pave the way for future international sales of the F-110 frigate and new technologies, including the new S-band radar.

For more information about Lockheed Martin radars, visit www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/capabilities/radar-sensors.html.

About Lockheed Martin

Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 105,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

CES 2020: The Intelligence of Things

01/06/2020 | Nolan Johnson, I-Connect007
Show week for CES 2020 starts well ahead of the actual exhibition dates because it is huge. The organizers of CES state that there are more than 4,400 exhibiting companies and nearly three million net square feet of exhibit space. On the floor, you can find 307 of the 2018 Fortune Global 500 companies. Over the week, I-Connect007 Editors Dan Feinberg and Nolan Johnson will bring you some of the most interesting news, products, and announcements from 5G to IoT, semiconductor developments, autonomous vehicle technology, interconnect, fabrication materials, and much more.

NASA Sounding Rocket Technology Could Enable Simultaneous, Multi-Point Measurements — First-Ever Capability

10/21/2019 | NASA
NASA engineers plan to test a new avionics technology — distributed payload communications — that would give scientists a never-before-offered capability in sounding rocket-based research.

For Climbing Robots, the Sky's the Limit

07/15/2019 | NASA
Robots can drive on the plains and craters of Mars, but what if we could explore cliffs, polar caps and other hard-to-reach places on the Red Planet and beyond? Designed by engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, a four-limbed robot named LEMUR (Limbed Excursion Mechanical Utility Robot) can scale rock walls, gripping with hundreds of tiny fishhooks in each of its 16 fingers and using artificial intelligence (AI) to find its way around obstacles.



Copyright © 2020 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.