Raytheon to Enhance Flight Performance of Us ARMY Hypersonic Weapon Glide Body


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Raytheon Company will build and deliver the control, actuation and power-conditioning subassemblies that control flight of the U.S. Army's new Common-Hypersonic Glide Body program. The work will enhance the system's flight performance and will be performed under Dynetics Corporation contracts.

The Army is leading a team with the U.S. Navy and Air Force to deliver hypersonic weapons that are launched from land, sea or air and will travel at speeds greater than Mach 5.

"Raytheon is at the forefront of hypersonic technology development," said Dr. Thomas Bussing, Raytheon Advanced Missile Systems vice president. "We will bring our years of advanced weapons development experience to rapidly transform the government's initial concept into a producible design." 

Hypersonic weapons will enable the U.S. military to reach out farther and strike faster compared to current weapons. Raytheon is developing both offensive and defensive solutions as part of its expanding hypersonic portfolio. 

Raytheon will also help assemble and test the new glide body under the Dynetics Corporation contracts.

About Raytheon 

Raytheon Company, with 2018 sales of $27 billion and 67,000 employees, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, civil government and cybersecurity solutions. With a history of innovation spanning 97 years, Raytheon provides state-of-the-art electronics, mission systems integration, C5I products and services, sensing, and mission support for customers in more than 80 countries. Raytheon is headquartered in Waltham, Massachusetts.

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