Nathan Trotter Expands with New Solder Production Facility


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Nathan Trotter today announced that they have purchased a 34,000 sq. ft. facility in Coatesville, Pennsylvania so that their current business can expand, allowing them more flexibility in manufacturing and inventory management. This acquisition adds to the primary Coatesville facility and the West Chester recycling facility (Tin Tech), giving Nathan Trotter a total footprint of 110,000 sq. ft in Southeastern Pennsylvania.

“The new facility will allow for expansion of solder bar and wire production, including the new NT100Ge alloy,” said Luke Etherington, managing partner at Nathan Trotter.

Etherington is referring to the new line of solder products, NT100Ge, which they will offer as a replacement for SN100C now that the related patent has expired. The additional space also will offer the ability for Nathan Trotter to create dedicated lines for certain high-volume products, which will shorten lead times and ensure the level of quality that customers have come to expect.

As the largest importer of tin in North America, Nathan Trotter offers industry-best pricing and flexible purchasing programs. Nathan Trotter also offers a leading-edge solder recycling program through its reclaim division, Tin Technology and Refining (www.tintech.com), which provides customers with maximum value for their solder scrap including dross and oxide, pot dumpings, paste and solder debris.

About Nathan Trotter & Co.

Founded in 1789, Nathan Trotter is the oldest continuously operated metals manufacturer in the US. The company proudly serves the automotive, aerospace, electronics, plating, and chemical industries globally. Please visit www.nathantrotter.com for more information.

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