NASA Awards $608 Million Contract to PAE-KBR Joint Venture


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NASA recently announced it awarded the Base Operations, Spaceport Services contract at the Kennedy Space Center to the joint venture PAE-SGT Partners LLC, known as PSP. The firm fixed-price contract with a potential value of $608.7 million is for institutional support services at both the Kennedy Space Center and the NASA facilities at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The contract is two years followed by three two-year options. It has cost reimbursable and indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity components.

PAE's CEO John Heller attributes his organization's unique mission suitability as a competitive edge.

"Our continued exemplary performance at the Johnson Space Center as well as our recent performance at Mississippi's Stennis Space Center and the New Orleans's Michoud Assembly facility provided us with unique, proven capabilities to position us to win this contract," Heller said. "The synergy we have with our high-caliber JV partner and our collective proven past performance and relevant experience ensured PSP as the best overall value."

SGT was acquired by KBR, Inc. (NYSE: KBR) in April 2018 and was integrated into KBR's global government services business, KBRwyle.

KBRwyle has provided mission-critical space support services to NASA and other customers for more than 60 years. It currently operates at 11 NASA centers and facilities and supports work in the areas of space technology, aeronautics, science, exploration and operations. KBRwyle is one of the world's largest human spaceflight support organizations and a leading solutions provider to the civil, military and commercial space segments.

"This is an exciting win that significantly expands our relationship with NASA and grows our space franchise," said Stuart Bradie, KBR president and CEO. "It demonstrates the new growth we are experiencing as a direct result of our acquisition of SGT."

PSP will provide mission-focused institutional support including: operations, maintenance and engineering of assigned facilities, systems, equipment and utilities; work management and spaceport integration functions, mission support and launch readiness management as well as other services.

About PAE

For more than 60 years, PAE has tackled the world's toughest challenges to deliver agile and steadfast solutions to the U.S. government and its allies. With more than 20,000 employees on all seven continents and in more than 70 countries, PAE delivers a broad range of operational support services to meet the critical needs of our clients. Our headquarters is in Falls Church, Virginia.

About KBR, Inc.

KBR is a global provider of differentiated professional services and technologies across the asset and program lifecycle within the Government Services and Hydrocarbons sectors. KBR employs approximately 36,000 people worldwide (including our joint ventures), with customers in more than 75 countries, and operations in 40 countries, across three synergistic global businesses:

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