Comtech Nets $2.1 Million Contract Modification from U.S. Army


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Comtech Telecommunications Corp. announced today that, during its fourth quarter of fiscal 2017, its Maryland-based Command & Control Technologies group, which is part of Comtech’s Government Solutions segment, has received a contract modification valued at $2.1 million from the U. S. Army Project Manager (PM) Warfighter Information Network-Tactical (WIN-T). The modification increases the total amount funded on this delivery order from $22.1 million to $24.2 million. The funding will provide enhanced communications infrastructure for U.S. forces in the Central Command (CENTCOM) Area of Responsibility (AOR).

“Comtech has established itself as a trusted provider to the maneuver elements of the armed forces by delivering reliable, secure communications systems,” said Fred Kornberg, President and Chief Executive Officer of Comtech Telecommunications Corp. “This award further illustrates that Comtech is making an important contribution to their mission success.”

The Command & Control Technologies group is a leading provider of mission-critical, highly-mobile C4ISR solutions.

About Comtech Telecommunications Corp.

Comtech Telecommunications Corp. designs, develops, produces and markets innovative products, systems and services for advanced communications solutions. The Company sells products to a diverse customer base in the global commercial and government communications markets.

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